Albert Einstein and Marie Curie

Einstein and Curie

Albert Einstein was quite impressed by Marie Curie when he met her. So much so, that when Marie was dealing with a public attack on her persona for having exchanged love letters with a fellow scientist who was married, but at the time estranged from his wife, Einstein came to her defense.

He wrote her, “I am so enraged by the base manner in which the public is presently daring to concern itself with you that I absolutely must give vent to this feeling…I am impelled to tell you how much I have come to admire your intellect, your drive, and your honesty, and that I consider myself lucky to have made your personal acquaintance in Brussels…If the rabble continues to occupy itself with you, then simply don’t read that hogwash, but rather leave to the reptile for whom it has been fabricated.”

Mark Twain Quote

“Education: the path from cocky ignorance to miserable uncertainty.”

– Mark Twain

Note: photograph from Tuxedo Park, New York, 1907.

Source: Mark Twain Papers, Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley.

Norma Jeane

Norma Jeane, who would become known to the world as Marilyn Monroe, building a drone while working in a military factory in Van Nuys, California to help the U.S. war effort during WWII.

Dr. Seuss

“You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself in any direction you choose. You’re on your own, and you know what you know. And you are the guy who’ll decide where to go.”

– Dr. Seuss

Note: photograph is of Theodor Seuss Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss, from 1925.

Elizabeth Keckley

Elizabeth Keckley

Elizabeth Keckley was born a slave in Dinwiddie Court-House, in Virginia.

But she was skilled at making relationships with the right people and for being business savvy, and the time came that Elizabeth was able to secure a loan to buy her freedom and the freedom of her son.

As a free woman, life would take her to Washington DC, where she became a dressmaker. The dressmaker of the city. For “her garments had extraordinary fit” and were worn by many notable women, including Varina Davis, the wife of Jefferson Davis, and Mary Todd Lincoln, the wife of Abraham Lincoln.

Sources: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/…/the-story-of-elizabeth-ke…/…https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Keckley